THIS WEEK ON MEDIA MORNINGS: Aug 10—Energy East pipeline—Anti-Nuclear—Sammy Yatim killing & police history

This Week on Media Mornings is a weekly independent Canadian and global news hour, featuring the top headlines and commentators from the past week. We bring you news you won’t hear anywhere else — a grassroots view on the week’s top global and national affairs.

Protesters opposing TransCanada’s projects carry a mock pipeline at a US protest (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
  •  03:00 — This week’s top news headlines from across Canada and around the world. Produced & hosted by David P. Ball and Derrick O’Keefe.

  • 35:45 — Ajamu Nangwaya (organizer, Network for Pan-Afrikan Solidarity) on mobilizing against the police killing of 18-year old Sammy Yatim, and a history of racialized police violence and settler colonialism in Canada over decades. Interviewed by Derrick O’Keefe.

  • 48:00 — Celyn Dufay (campaign organizer, Rideau Institute)on the global movement to ban nuclear weapons, and Ceasefire.ca’s Louder than the Bomb campaign, on the 68th anniversary of the U.S. bombing of Hiroshima. Interviewed by Derrick O’Keefe.

  • Music: Ben Caplan (“Down to the River”), A Tribe Called Red (“Woodcarver”), Emilia Curran (“The Modern Man”).

THIS WEEK’S TOP NEWS HEADLINES

  • TOP STORY: POLICE SHOOTINGS — Days after a deadly shooting in Toronto sparked a debate over police use of force, Alberta’s police watchdog is looking into three separate incidents that saw officers use their firearms or a Taser, including one incident which killed an Aboriginal man who starred in the tv show Mantracker. The debate over how much force police should use was propelled into the national spotlight last week after the fatal shooting of Sammy Yatim, 18, in Toronto last month. Yatim died after being shot by police aboard an empty Toronto streetcar he had cleared out by brandishing a knife, prompting calls for criminal charges to be filed against the officer who fired the shots. (NATIONAL POST).
  • CANADA: SENATE EXPENSES SCANDAL — The audit of Sen. Pamela Wallin is complete. The RCMP is investigating the expense claims of four senators, for hundreds of thousands of dollars of improper reimbursements (POSTMEDIA).
  • MANITOBA: HUMAN RIGHTS MUSEUM CONTROVERSY — A Manitoba First Nation organization is slamming the Canadian Museum of Human Rights for refusing to use the term “genocide” in the title of an exhibit on Canada’s policies toward Indigenous people over the past century. Recent academic studies have found that Canada’s actions over the past century meet the definition of genocide under the UN Convention, particularly in the wake of revelations Canada did medical and starvation tests on children in residential schools (APTN).

  • NEW BRUNSWICK: TRANSCANADA OIL SANDS PIPELINE ANNOUNCED — TransCanada has announced its Energy East oil sands pipeline plans. The proposal still needs regulatory approval, and would send 1.1 billion barrels a day to Eastern Canada. The project will cost more than $12 billion, but is facing opposition from environmental groups and First Nations (CBC).

  • USA: EMBASSIES CLOSED, NSA PROTESTS — The Obama administration has announced it will keep 19 diplomatic outposts in North Africa and the Middle East closed for up to a week due to fears of a possible militant threat. The closures came as Opponents of the National Security Agency’s sweeping surveillance at home and abroad held a second nationwide day of action against the programs Sunday. The group “Restore the Fourth” protested in several U.S. cities on what it dubbed “1984 Day,” named for the book by George Orwell about a dystopian surveillance society (DEMOCRACY NOW!).
  • USA: FRACKING GAG ORDER — Two young children in Pennsylvania are banned from talking about fracking for the rest of their lives under a gag order imposed under a settlement reached by their parents with a leading oil and gas company (GUARDIAN).

  • EGYPT: DEMONSTRATIONS CONTINUE — More protests in Egypt following the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi, with fears tensions could lead to further violence. Egypt’s government is cracking down on pro-Morsi sit ins, but the country remains divided over whether the ouster was a military coup, or a response to mass protests against the government (CNN).
  • AFRICA: AIDS DEATHS FALLING — AIDS deaths and HIV infections in eastern and southern Africa are falling dramatically, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS says. But Canadian AIDS activists say there’s still lots of work to be done (CBC).

  • JAPAN: FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR POLLUTION — Japan’s nuclear watchdog says that the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant has been facing a new “emergency” that the plant’s operator is not sufficiently addressing. Radioactive contaminated groundwater seeping into the ocean breached an underground barrier and was rising towards the surface (AL JAZEERA).

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